Archive for March, 2014

Tuesday Training: Tactical Weapon Reconfiguration

Every Tuesday I take a skill which one of my characters is training and discuss why I am current training that skill. I will also look at other uses for the skill, and who else might benefit from it. As I have several Characters across the skill spectrum I expect to cover skills for Young, Middle Age and old players. Yeah so once again I missed this one out last week as it was the beginning of a very long working hours week (which I am now writing to you from the of, so please excuse the large number of mistakes!).

This week’s Choices:

  • Explosive Armor Compensation V
  • Surgical Strike V
  • Tactical Weapons Reconfiguration V
  • Command Centre Upgrades  V

I have to admit that it’s not a particularly inspiring line-up, being all high level boring trains which increase aspects of your character by a few percent. So I’m going to try talking less about what the skill does this week, and instead discuss why I am training it personally. So let’s go with Tactical Weapons Upgrades V. Again as usual I am going to list its official  *words*:

Tactical Weapon Reconfiguration (x8) Per, Will

Skill at operation of siege modules. 25 unit reduction in strontium clathrate consumption amount for module activation per skill level.

So what does this skill really do? Well from level 1-4 all it does in reduce the operating costs of the Siege module (and not by a lot). However at level 5 it allows you to upgrade your Siege module to Tech II, giving a significant increase to the efficiency of your Dreadnaught in Siege mode. So other than simple getting a T2 Siege mod, why am I training this? Well the character training this is my new Dread alt, currently only capable of jumping dreads from X -> Z, completely incapable of using it for anything but travel. I have decided that it’s time to upgrade this character from travel only, to a combat Dread alt. It’s a pretty significant train, at 140 days optimized and implanted, but in exchange I will be able to operate two accounts during large fights such as B-R, or Structure Bashing ops, it will also mean that when traveling between staging systems, I will no longer have to swap the dreadnought between accounts, and, more importantly, I will stop invalidating my insurance everything we move system. Who knows, perhaps one day it may lead to a dedicated Super Capital alt, but that’s a very long way off. For now I am simply looking forwards to having a dedicated capital alt.

Fly Dreads,

Hark.

Blog Banter #54: Polarizing Express

Today’s topic comes Diaries of a Space Noob blog and other sources:
Quick post. I was listening to a song and a question occurred to me. Where are the EVE heroes? Against a dark background surely all we have are anti-heroes? A lot of mockery is aimed at any who attempt to be white knights. EVE is a dark place and yet pretty much all other MMO’s try to place the player in the role of some form of hero, boosting the ego and taking the player out of the humdrum 1 in 7 billion that is RL. Why have I fitted into EVE? Did I never want to be that? So I guess my question is:
 
Do classic heroes exist in EVE? Is such heroism even possible in EVE? How would you go about being one without opening yourself wide open to scams? Is the nature of the game so dark that heroes can’t exist? How do you deal with that irony? What effect does this have on us and the psyche of new players coming in from other MMOs? Is it something special that we don’t have classic heroes, or should we? Are our non classic heroes more genuine?
And I would add to this, who have we elevated to the level of larger than life heroes ourselves in the game, and do they actually deserve it?
From The Inner Sanctum of the Ninveah

Eve is Real. It’s the marketing statement (which seems to have waned a little of late) which CCP uses to tagline eve and, by comparison, CCP does have a fair point, eve apes real life far better than, say, Guild Wars II: People interact, they touch each other’s in game life and affect others as they pass. A characters progression in Eve is the result of millions of factors defined by the game, and its players, developing a unique individual story unlike any that have come before it. I believe that this is why we don’t have any of what classic video games describe as “Heroes”, real life has none either. Games such as Guild Wars and World of Warcraft tell us that the Hero is an individual who through some means or another ends up making choices and performing actions which are clearly for the greater good (The Greater Good). They can see the bigger picture and they act as they see fit to help their cause. Yet in eve, as in real life, it is never so clear cut as to what is good and what is bad. Often things which seem good now, a few months down the line can turn out to be detrimental to the greater good (The Greater Good). If you can find a person who can tell me what the greater good (The Greater Good) is, even just within eve, I will find a person who has blinkered their perception to a limited scope. I think that the same is true for real life as well.

But let’s expound the in game side of that further; Games like Guild Wars II and Warcraft, tell us a story, they show us our Character and carefully craft a story around them showing how they progress from nobody, to (what a Video Game considers a Hero. Eve on the other hand gives us a character, and asks “what is your story?”. Because of this lack of control we cannot be engineered to be Heroes which other games prescribe us, we have to make our own choices, and some will always be wrong. In Guild Wars, there is no wrong decision, things will always turn out all right, and our character (short of not playing) will always become the Hero (or at worst, the Anti-Hero). In eve we have no such omnipotence (Ironic for the “God like” capsular), and so we can never be the classic “Video Game Hero”, because they cannot exist in a world of free choice.

“But Hark”, I hear you cry,” there are Hero’s in real life, what about people like Mother Teresa? Or Gandhi? Or even War Heroes such as Thomas Lawrence? Or how about Local Heroes like Firemen and the Police!?”. And you’re right, these examples, and millions more, are Real life Heroes, nothing like their Video Game and Movie counter parts (except perhaps Lawrence, but I’ll get to that in a bit), and eve has better analogues to them, than it does to other games definitions of Heroes. Of course pacifist Heroes, Rights Heroes and Caring Heroes struggle to survive in a universe of equal, immortal war mongers, but you could draw parallels to people such as Sindel Pellion (The Angel Project), Grevlon Goblin (who is no hero to me, but again more on that in a moment), and others. You can also look to Logistics pilots (of both kinds), for the nearest equivalent of Local Heroes. But again, this is where we get to the issue of perception, which is an issue in real-life just as it is in eve.

You and me might look at someone like Arthur Harris (a.k.a Bomber Harris) and declare them a Hero. A man making tough decisions to fight the Nazi movement. Commissioning raids to defend the United Kingdom, and crucial to the War effort. Yet that perception of “Hero” comes from our own personal beliefs, feelings and social alignment. For example, I feel that Extremists (in any form) are wrong, and in a situation like World War II where Extremists attempt to subjugate they must be opposed. Therefore to me, people who stand up and fight them, are heroes. Yet if I were an extremist, say a White Supremacist, or indeed a Nazi, I would consider someone fighting against whatever my movement was, as an enemy, and not a hero.

Now most people in the free world are governed by social acceptance, and we are brought up to think in a certain way; so 99% of people would answer like I do with conviction that the Nazis were wrong, and that the Allied Forces of WWII (and their supporters back home) were heroes. But in eve, no such mass social governance is in place. If your character “Grew up” in High Sec, you might have been taught that Goonswarm are evil and should be eradicated (I will use Goonswarm a lot in this as they are a very polarising group). On the other hand if you “Grew up” within Goonswarm, reaping its generosity to newbie members you would consider them just and right.

Because within eve there is no base level of social moral code, our personal convictions are whimsy, and can be easily influenced by the current political situation and personal circumstance. A Test pilot not so long ago, would have preached praise for brother Goon, where now they would likely speak of betrayal and revenge. Because “Good” and “Evil” are dependent on where you stand, likewise, “Hero” and “War Criminal” are also based on perspective. My Heroes, are my enemies scoundrels and targets, and his mine.

Here come’s my second issue with the label of “Hero” in eve, I chose Bomber Harris as my real world example of a polarising Hero, not only because he would be considered bad from the Nazis point of view, but also because you could debate his actions from other point of view. Harris, was a proponent of “Area bombing” over “Precision bombing”, despite its higher civilian “collateral damage”. He was also a large part of the planning and execution of the Dresden Bombing, which killed more than 22,000 people, mostly civillians. Now I have my personal views on this, as every person has a right to, but the fact is that because of things like this, Bomber Harris, and many Heroes like him, have debatable status as Heroes. In eve, within the lore of the game, we as capsular are an aloof elite, killing millions, cold and uncaring of the stricken poverty and squalor bellow us, surely more than any real life analogy, no matter what we do, our characters status as “Heroes” is always going to be debatable.

So let us summarise (and welcome to all who skipped the wall of text). “Video Game Heroes” don’t exist in eve, because there is no guiding narrative to build them. Video Game Heroes, don’t exists in real life because they require the omnipotence of a predefined narrative to create them and, as with real life in eve, we define the Narrative. Because of this eve is more like Real life where Heroes are a matter of perspective, and eve’s lack of moral guidance makes perspective a far more variable thing than in real life. Furthermore because of the limitations of a Video game, the sacrifice required to become a “Real life” hero, is hard to make. Even more limiting is the fact that the game lore dictates that our characters are all, by definition, at least a shade of Evil, meaning again as an amplified effect of real life, all our Heroes morals can be called into question.

Fly bombers,

Hark

Tuesday Training: Minmatar Engineering Systems

Every Tuesday I take a skill which one of my characters is training and discuss why I am current training that skill. I will also look at other uses for the skill, and who else might benefit from it. As I have several Characters across the skill spectrum I expect to cover skills for Young, Middle Age and old players. Please excuse this late running post, as I was unexpectedly out of town for the last couple of days.

 

This week’s Choices:

  • Minmatar Engineering Systems V
  • Surgical Strike V
  • Capital Ships V
  • Command Centre Upgrades V

 

A fresh sheet this week, with no skills previously covered! But as I mentioned in the last training Tuesday, I’d really like to look into the T3 skills. Minmatar Engineering Systems V is the very last Subsystem skill I need to train to have a base line of V, and I have been very pleased with the ships effectiveness. But let’s take a look at the skill itself.

 

Minmatar Engineering Systems (x1) Int, Mem

Skill in operation of Minmatar Engineering Subsystems used on Tech III Ships.

 

This skill is pretty much the same as all others in the category, simply replacing the Engineering with either; Defensive, Offensive, Propulsion or Electronic, and the Minmatar with the other races.

 

All of these skills have similar shadowy skill descriptions where the actual reward isn’t shown in the skill itself, but to understand their advantage we need to understand T3’s, so: Subsystems, important enough to own their own section of the skill list, are unique to T3 ships, and allow pilots to customise the slot layout, fitting resources, hard points and bonuses of a T3 ship. Each races T3 ship has 5 subsystems slots, which can be filled by one of four sub system modules. There are lots of nuances to the system, but the core concept needed for this post is that each of these five choices will provided a different bonus to your ship, which is multiplied that Race/Subsystem skill. By having all my T3 subsystem kills to V, each T3 ship I have gives me 5 bonuses 5 times each. For example my old Loki setup gave me:

 

150% (30% per level) bonus to Stasis Webifier range

20% (4% per level) bonus to armor resistances

25% (5% per level) additional Power Grid (coming to a total of 600 additional PG)

50% (10% per level) bonus to After Burner speed

 

Now these Bonuses can change dramatically depending on the sub system itself which makes the T3 a very versatile ship class that’s popular in both PvE and PvP. Of course all things must have downsides, and the issue with the T3 class, is that the subsystem skills are the only ones your likely to have to train more than once (assuming you keep your clone up to date!). You see every time you lose a T3 ship you will also lose one level of your highest trained corresponding sub system, picking at random if they are all trained to the same level. Owch.

 

Of course T3 Sub system skills are only a x1 multiplier, meaning they take around 8-10 days from start to finish, with 3-4 days of that being level V. Levels 1-4 all take well within a single day to train. So although the loss of skills isn’t insignificant at level 5 they are still going to take some time to repair.

 

Here it is worth noting that although I have some Lvl4 mission running experience, I have never personally used a T3 to do them. I always found them underwhelming in both Tank, and DPS, despite their excellent signature and speed tanking abilities. Personally I felt that a Macharial beat them in almost every category. But at the same time I am aware that they are worshiped as PvE gods by some, likely for good reason, so if you are a young PvE player, looking for advice, the following may not apply to you.

 

T3 ships are expensive, both in training time (if you lose them) and Isk (also if you lose them), they do however feature in several current Nullsec Doctrines, and have had a place in Null for a while now. I would advise that for a new player looking to break into Nullsec, they are very much a 2.5 tier train:

 

Teir 1: Train Tackling ships & versatile hulls such as Interceptors, Interdictor and T1 logistics, to maximise your usefulness to fleets.

Teir 2: Train ship of the line hulls, ensuring that you can use all hulls and all weapon systems

Teir 3: Train specialist ships to help your fleets, such as Logistics, Recon and Bonus ships

 

Quick enough to train that they don’t quite fall into Tier 3, but also specialist enough that they are not Ships of the Line. Although they don’t take long to get into, you will need excellent ancillary skills to use them effectively. In including both overheating and drug skills, both Veteran categories which I may discuss at a later date!

 

Fly like a Swiss army knife!

 

Hark

 

 

Tuesday Training: Command Center Upgrades

Every Tuesday I take a skill which one of my characters is training and discuss why I am current training that skill. I will also look at other uses for the skill, and who else might benefit from it. As I have several Characters across the skill spectrum I expect to cover skills for Young, Middle Age and old players.

 

 

This week’s Choices:

  • Minmatar Defensive Systems V
  • Amarr Battleship IV  (out, as I covered  the Amarr Cruiser  one last week)
  • Gunnery V
  • Command Centre Upgrades IV

 

It was a tough call on which one to talk about this week. I would really like to cover the T3 Sub systems skills in another broad stroke at some point, but in the end I have chosen Command Centre Upgrades as the Skill for this week’s discussion. I’ll likely cover another T3 Sub system next week as an excuse to talk about T3 skills in general.

 

As usual I’ll start off by giving the actual skill notes from the game:

 

Command Centre Upgrades (x4) Charisma, Intelligence

Each level in this skill improves the quality of command facility available to you, in turn allowing for a greater number of connected facilities on that planet. Cannot be trained on Trial Accounts.

 

This is another skill where the true value of its training, cannot be found in the skills description itself, instead we have to look into the properties of the Upgrades available on the Command Centres themselves. First however its worth doing a quick overview of Planetary Interaction (PI from here) and what this skill means for it.

 

PI, simply defined is a capsular’s ability to build installations on planets, which extract, process, store, import and export materials. These materials, referred to as Planetary commodities are used in a number of products including, but not limited to; nanite repair paste, structures and P.O.S Fuels. The centre of any PI installation network is the Command Centre, which is the first module placed on a planet allowing further development.  Command Centres also define the CPU and Power grid available to a planet’s colony, which all other installations consume.

 

So with this ground work in mind, how does the skill work? Quite simply, a Command Centre has 6 levels. The base command centre starts at level 1 (when placed on a planet), and can be upgraded 5 times to reach level 6. Each upgrade has a cost (in a bell curve increment), but in return increases the maximum CPU and PG available to your colony. Fully upgrading a colony to level 6 will cost you 6.4m Isk.

 

My aim in this post is to give you an idea of the value of PG/CPU to a colony, as well as showing the Time taken per unit of PG/CPU each level in the skill will give you. Armed with this I will present my conclusion of each levels increase in potential value, and you can make your own choices on how important each level is to you. As an aside to this post, there is an assertion I should like to make: Any player, who has a character who stays relatively still somewhere in the universe (for more than a few weeks at a time), should have a PI colony set up. Even a simple Colony with, one or two login’s per week will net the player a few million isk each log in, although mileage will vary. My colonies with a login per day, across 1.1 characters earns me around 20m/day, 140m/Week or 560m/Month, that’s the cost of an account in exchange for 30 minutes a day, your stupid if you are not doing it.

 

But anyway, back to the main point. Let’s start giving a value to PG/CPU. PI is all about maximising efficiency CPU/PG, directly control what Structures you can place on the planet, which effect this efficiency. Let’s looks at some case points to give you an idea of the value of a unit of each type:

 

  • 500 Mw (PG) and 110 Tf (CPU), will allow you to place a new extraction head on an Extraction Control unit, increasing your raw material extraction.
  • 800 Mw and 200 tf will allow you to build a Basic Industry Facility which will allow you to process more raw product into T1 and T2 materials (worth more) and T2 into T3 materials.
  • 9200 Mw and 1720 tf  will allow you to build a new Extraction Control Unit and fill it with all 12 extractor heads, dramatically increasing your raw material extraction.

 

I’ve made a series of wild estimations (some high and some low), based on what you could add with more CPU and PG, and how much extra that will earn you. I’ve then taken these estimates and averaged them to find a good middle ground for these guesses. From this I estimate that, based on my earnings, a Unit of CPU and a Unit of PG are worth  1434.34 isk/unit and 716.21 Isk/unit respectively. Please note that this is a terrible way of estimating, and I am a terrible estimator, so this really is a massively ballpark figure, designed simply to give a rough idea.

 

So now let’s look at how much you get per level of upgrade in the Command Centre. Based off the Eve wiki chart:

 

PI Command Isk

 

Again, note the terribleness of my estimation abilities, but at the same time except that the according to this estimation (based on my personal experience of PI production in Highsec) a fully upgraded Command Centre should earn around 21m every 24 hours, damned close to what I see being produced by my colony every day (p.s. I am amazed that worked). Please note that this assumes all the other skills for PI are at Lvl 5, and doesn’t take into account any taxes or other costs involved in PI so again, mileage may vary.

 

 

So all that done, is Command Centre upgrades worth it? To what level, and to whom? Well this doesn’t really depend so much on your character age, as it does your personal engagement with PI, and exactly what you need. If your fully committed to making money through PI, and are ready to commit to a schedule of updating your miners, then the chances are that yes, its worth training it as high as you can. Its also worth checking that you are going to have a use for the extra fitting space on your planners, after all there is no point in spending 20 days training level five, only to find that there is nothing useful to do with the extra PG/CPU. For someone entering into the market however, I would recommend aiming for level three to begin with, and seeing what you can do with that. At only 17 hours training, your not going to feel lost if PI doesn’t work for you, and its enough to get started with a good colony. Once you have that up and running, you’ll also spend some time learning and understanding the system, so you’ll know what to do with the extra PG/CPU once you train it. If you do its 3 days for level 4 then another 20  to Finnish it at level 5.

 

Have fun, and fly into the ground,
Hark

 

 

Further reading on PI can be found at the Eve Wiki, and Eve University

Don’t call it a comeback…

One month I will come on here and tell you all about how wonderful everything is, and how well all my endeavours have gone. This is not that month.

 

Activity wise however, this month has actually been pretty amazing, with PL finally recouping and deploying after the wrecking shot which has B-R (#NOMAD). The new deployment, while a little unclear on purpose, has both promised and delivered great content. The deployment has, so far has already used more Turret based ships that I have used since the beginning of the Halloween war in total. I’ve never been a huge fan of capital combat, but as a realist I have to accept that Slowcat doctrines do get the job done. They just don’t get it done in a fun way. So returning to the turret based ships of yesteryear has been a truly pleasant experience.

 

I’ve also had the chance on this deployment to use a new Turret based ship, I’d never used before: the Dreadnaught. My Moros moved with me to our new staging system, and I got the opportunity to deploy it on what was a fairly (for eve) safe fleet. This gave me the chance to get used to its operation, and  foibles so that I now feel confident enough to deploy it in earnest. The staggering damage output has blown me away, and I look forwards to doing more with it

 

Xa has also begun to shake of the sluggishness of a winter hibernation. Other than the casual selling of assets in the name liquidation, she’s really done nothing since late last year. With the liquidation now coming to a close, I am starting to think about what to do with her next. Exploration was fun, and I intend to go back to that at some point, however first I think I need to finish the Epic Arc quest I started well over a year ago… the Isk/Hour ratio on that one is way down.

 

Unfortunately to finish that, I’m going to need to move Xa from her current corporation (which is in Faction Warfare), to allow her free movement across New Eden. As Xa is currently the CEO of the corp, I will need to train another alt to take her place during her absence. Still it’s worth it to make more money and play more eve.

 

The Manufacturer has also remained busy this month, with production increasing exponentially again this month, something I doubt will continue much further. With any luck I will bring her total assets up to about 600m next month, allowing me to pay back her loans, and begin processing blueprints I bought in a fit of unfounded ambition before checking build costs. It’s all part of the learning curve they say. Still I’m not counting my chickens before they are hatched here, this is after all New Eden, and all kinds of things can go wrong between now and then.

 

She has also dusted off the PI factories and actually started to process the glut of raw product I have been building up over the last 5 months. When Highsec POCO’s hit TQ, I was stupid and forgot to empty my materials out of the now vulnerable Interbus POCO, losing about 50m’s worth of Raw mats to an entrepreneurial capsular. For some reason, since then, although my extraction planets have been going from strength to strength, I was never bothered enough to shift it to the production planet for processing. The net result is a massive build-up for Mats, I am now starting to work my way through; though again not counting that profit until it’s in the bank.

 

Regular readers will have a good idea of my current skill status from the now (slightly ir)regular Tuesday training post I do. But to give a month forecast:

Hark is finishing sub systems this month and moving into perfecting tanking

Xa is filling gaps in her racial skill set

The dread Alt is finishing Fuel conservation and considering her next move

And the Indy is perfecting her production before moving into PI

 

Isk wise is where the slight bump in the road for this month lies. They say never to fly drunk, however I would further add to this, that trading when ill is also a poor life choice. While home ill last week I attempted to do my regular trading log in, and managed to sell 3 Rokhs for 100m under their RRP, netting the trader a loss of 300m ish. This is now third top on my most costly mistakes list, after Jumping to a beacon blind, and accidentally trashing a Hulk and then confirming it (drunk).

 

Despite this I am still cruising in for 500m profit this month, even including the 500m I have spent on Dreadnaught insurance. This is pretty impressive as between a cold, and bone-idelness I have only logged in the trader ~6 times in the 30 days. I’m expecting next month to come in far better, both in logins and in profit.

 

Fly with turrets,

 

Hark

 

 

 

 

Tuesday Training: Amarr Cruiser V (and Cross training)

Every Tuesday I take a skill which one of my characters is training and discuss why I am current training that skill. I will also look at other uses for the skill, and who else might benefit from it. As I have several Characters across the skill spectrum I expect to cover skills for Young, Middle Age and old players.

 

 

This week’s Choices (Only two as one was covered last week, and one the week before).

  • Caldari Electronic Systems V
  • Amarr Cruiser IV

 

Not much of a choice really, and both ship skills as well, what’s come over me? I’m going to discuss the Amarr Cruisers IV train, briefly in terms of what it gives you, but broadly as an excuse to talk about Racial Ships, and cross training.

 

First of let’s look at the skill itself:

Amarr Cruiser (x5) Perception, Willpower

Skill at operating Amarr Cruisers

 

Not much huh? But here is what you’re really get for your money:

Skill level I:

  • Arbitrator
  • Augoror
  • Maller
  • Omen

Skill level II:

  • Ashimmu (if you have Minmatar Cruiser II)
  • Augoror Navy Issue
  • Omen Navy Issue
  • Phantasm (if you have Caldari Cruiser II)
  • Stratios (if you have Gallente Cruiser II

Skill level II

  • Ability to train Amarr Battleships

Skill level V:

  • Ability to use/train all T2 Amarr Cruisers

 

For each level of the skill you also get a bonus to the four Amarr Cruisers (and the faction cruisers). An example of this would be for the Omen, where each level of Amarr Cruisers give you an additional 10% reduction in Medium Energy Turret activation cost, and an additional 5% bonus to Energy Turret Rate of fire per level.

 

Impressive.

 

Boring stuff out of the way, let’s talk about the broader topic here, racial cross training. In eve I’ve met many pilots who are loyal to their birthing faction’s ships. They are vehement in their dedication to perfecting their chosen races ships, and train them (and thus their weapon systems, and tank type) exclusively. They also tend to get a bit hett up under the collar when people start mentioning doctrines which use anything else. I was one of these people too once, and I can tell you now, without hesitation that there is no good reason for it.

 

Cross training to a competent skill level for all four races takes around 5 months (ships, weapons and tank). To a new player, that may seem like an awful long time out of their skill queue, but in the long run it’s a pittance for the utility you get in return. In exchange for those five months you will always be able to fly something in your Alliance/Corporations doctrines, even if it’s a lowly tackle ship. You will also be able to apply the correct tool for the job; ratting in Guristas space? Use shields, Blood Raiders? Perhaps a Armour tanker would be best. There is nothing worse than coming up against a tough challenge (in PvP or PvE) and not having the right skills to overcome it, being able to fly each race, reduces the chances of this happening.

 

Furthermore, should you take the time to train those racial skills up to level 5 (I’m not saying you should out of the gates, but if you do…); you also get 4 ships each time you train T2 ships. Bonus!

 

Of course there is always a stage in your pilots life when cross training isn’t going to be worth it, in my opinion the utility this gives you makes, that is really only the first few months of an accounts life. Looking back as an experienced pilot, and having already training a good few alts, my advice would be to spend the a few months learning one race’s skills (weapons, tank, ships) to level 4, and practice using them; then immediately move onto another race. Once you have all the races to T1, then go back through and start training the skills to T2 (with a few exceptions).

 

If you a younger player, more than a year old who can only fly one or two races of ships: it’s time to break free, train a new races kit and enjoy the difference it can and will make to your abilities!

 

Fly multicultural,

 

Hark