Posts Tagged ‘newbi’

This means E-War!

Fighting BNI has been a very interesting experience during our stay in HLW. BNI have brought e-war into the battlefield in an entire new way which I had never really considered before. Specifically, in the major fights I have had with them, we have been engaging two enemy fleets, a core fleet of doctrine ships as you might expect from any alliance, and a secondary swarm of e-war noobies. The swarm are almost entirely in either noobships or ewar T1 frigates and form a ball around the engagement almost entrapping the two fleets at long range. From this surrounding position the ships then throw as much e-war (we found it was damping mostly) onto the enemy to hinder their ability to fight.

Now I’ve seen and used a lot of fleets which lever utility slots on ships to add a bit of e-war to fights, armour tanking BS’s are pretty good for this (see NApocs), but I’ve never seen an Alliance use Utility members. It’s a fantastic idea, that I think only BNI could pull off. Not only are the Low Skill new players helping their alliance in a very real way, but it only takes a matter of days to become decent enough at damping to get in a frigate and do this.

As an enemy combatant all I can say to this tactic is “Bravo”. It’s annoying as all hell but an amazing way of getting the new guys involved. Good job guys. See you in the next fight.

Fly fresh,

Hark

Dirty Guide to Eve: Training Deeper into Nullsec

Although I have many characters in many places in Eve, Nullsec has always been where my heart lies. Pretty much all of my other characters, are in some way or another designed to support my main in Null. As a Null player I think that it’s important to always encourage new players to venture out into Nullsec, to ensure we don’t get too bitter. To this end, this series of posts aims to aid new Nullsec pilots in their training, by specifying ships which are used in multiple doctrines; past, present and future, in Nullsec. Divided up into three posts (Quick Trains, Medium trains and the Long Term), pilots who follow this advice will find themselves quickly able to be useful within an Alliance. They will also be well poised to train more specialist ships to further flesh out their arsenal.

 

This section of the guide details some trains which will further develop your usefulness in Nullsec. This second part expects that you have already gone through the training in the “Quick Trains“, Guide  and assume that you have already completed all the training within that.

Let me address the Elephant in the room, while he is still buttering up to get through the doorway. This is going to be a long set of skill training. You’ve trained for 6 months now to get some ships which are brilliant at getting you into fleets. Hopefully you’ve found it beneficial, hopefully you have found a place within fleets to prosper and shine. Hopefully despite your low skill points your Alliance mates welcome you on fleets and consider you a valuable asset. Even if all this is true, the chances are you are still aching to get into a bog standard ship of the line. A good battleship, or cruiser perhaps. Something which lets you join in with the pack on their level. I would advise that you go ahead and scratch the itch. With the three ship types you trained already you should be all but assured access to fleets, and all regimented training and no impulse ships makes jack a dull boy. So go ahead, indulge. Perhaps you might even consider training the next section alongside some impulse training, 1:1 guide/impulse skills might make this go on forever, but something like a 2:1 might keep you going through what is going to be a long set of training skills.

Let’s touch on that some more. This second set of ships is going to be longer that what you have seen in the first guide. A lot longer. The true aim here is to bring you into the vaunted Logistics Cruisers. What before we do go into that however we will be bringing you into T1 Cruiser Hulls (similar to how the moved into T1 Frigate Hulls), so that you can learn the ropes in something cheaper. So it’s going to take a long time but the fact of the matter is that if you want to be truly versatile in your training, you are going to need to invest this kind of time into these ships. For some people the quick trains will be enough to be getting on with, certainly 90% of fleets will allow you in with the ships you trained for in the first 6 months. But if you finish this next set of training skills, 90% of Alliances will let you in just based on your skills (and eventually, experience).

So let’s get started…

 

T1 Cruisers

A simple short(er) one to start with. Training T1 cruisers is going to be important for a lot of these medium trains, and is also a stepping stone onto the Battleship Tier which you will require later. Training all Four races ships will take around 20 days, but you will need to train up Weapon and tanking systems as well. Specifically Consider training the following to level 3 (unless otherwise stated):

  • Energy Grid Management
  • Tactical Shield Manipulation
  • Missile Launcher Operation (IV)
  • Missile Bombardment
  • Missile Projection
  • Rapid Launch
  • Target Navigation Prediction
  • Warhead Upgrades
  • Heavy Missiles
  • Capacitor Emission Systems
  • Shield Rigging
  • Gunnery
  • Medium projectile Turret
  • Medium Energy Turret
  • Medium Hybrid Turret
  • Armor Layering
  • All Armor Compensation Skills
  • Shield Management
  • All Shield Compensation Skills
  • Weapons Upgrades
  • Armor Rigging

It’s a big load and will take you a further 30 days, but will serve to solidify your core competency. This will allow you to participate in any cruiser doctrines and will prep you for the next batch of Medium length trains.

 

T1 Logistics

This is a bit of a sidestep which will bring you within range of using the T1 Logistics Cruisers in fleets. Most PvP alliances will use the T2 Hulls for their logistics, but depending on how strict they are, they will likely allow a few of the T1 equivalents to join in as well. Chances are that there won’t be alliance fittings for these ships however, so ask a seasoned logistics pilot if they can help you out with fittings. We don’t need to train any new ships, as the Augoror, Osprey, Exequror and Scythe will already be available to you as T1 cruisers. However you will need to top up some Logistics support skills (to level 3 unless otherwise stated):

  • Repair Systems (II)
  • Remote Armor Repair Systems (IV)
  • Shield Emission Systems
  • Capacitor Management
  • Capacitor Systems Operation
  • Gravimetric Sensor Compensation
  • Ladar Sensor Compensation
  • Radar Sensor Compensation
  • Magnetometric Sensor Compensation

This will only take you around 4 days, and will let you dabble in the waters of Logistics. Consider reading my post dedicated to Logistics (although you can ignore the stuff on skills). You will also find the following guides more useful than my own:

Dabble in logistics now, while the ships are cheap and reap the rewards later when you’re flying a 200m ship in a fleet of T1 cruisers. This is the life of the logistics pilot.

 

Force Recon

For the first time I am going to advise you to not train all four races ships. From my experience the two races which are most likely to get you into fleets are the Minmattar and Gallente ships. With Webbing and Tackle modules these ships are always useful in a fleet, and are called for/accepted most of the time. As an added bonus, is a nice transition up from the Frigate size tackling ships you have been previously using. The tactics will be a little different, as you will now have longer range modules to do the tackling with, so you no longer need to charge into the enemy to forfill your role. Instead you will either be with the main fleet, or self-piloting on the edge of the enemies range, but within your logistics range. Again this all varies with how your FC likes to run things, so always ask about before you do something. Train Recon Ships to level IV before you start flying them.

Alongside the ship train, you should also be looking at improving your general skills, especially fitting I recommend the following skills (to level 4 unless otherwise marked) in addition to what you have trained for the Quick Trains support skills:

  • Cynosural Field Theory
  • Energy Grid Upgrades
  • Tactical Shield Manipulation
  • Hull Upgrades (V)

That’s it. All in this will take an additional 100 days to train, but will get you into a new more durable role.

This next one is the big one.

 

Logistics

Now we are moving into the big leagues. Logistics will not only get you into fleets, but it will also get you into Alliances. My acceptance into Pandemic Legion was highly influenced by my logistics specialisation, it certainly wasn’t the only factor which got me in, but it played a big role. But logistics isn’t a simple train, nor is it an easy upgrade from the ships you have been flying so far (with the exception of the T1 logistics ships you should be been learning in), it’s a whole new world of play.

To train into all 4 Races Logistics ships will take you an additional 90 days (you Require logistics V, this is only going to get longer). The following support skills should also be trained to level 4 unless otherwise stated:

  • Shield transfer Systems (V)
  • Capacitor Emission Systems (V)
  • Remote Armor Repair Systems (V)
  • Capacitor Management
  • Capacitor Systems Operations
  • Advanced Target Management (III)
  • All Sensor Compensation

In all honestly taking the additional 60 days to train all of these to V (with the exception of advanced target management for which no ship can use higher than the 8 Advanced lvl 3 gives you), is worth the extra time.

So there we go. 278 days’ worth of training in this “Medium” trains guide, on top of our original  set that a total of 462 days’ worth of training. I hope you have been enjoying Nullsec, because you’ve become pretty invested in it! Seriously however, I really believe that if you can make it this far, your time in Null is all but assured. In my next section I will be looking at the true long term ships including one which I believe it 100% required for every Nullsec Pilot (not even as a combat pilot, just as a matter of personal self-sufficiency). Until then however, get reping.

 

Fly flexible,

Hark

Dirty Guide To Eve: Training into Nullsec

Although I have many characters in many places in Eve, Nullsec has always been where my heart lies. Pretty much all of my other characters, are in some way or another designed to support my main in Null. As a Null player I think that it’s important to always encourage new players to venture out into Nullsec, to ensure we don’t get too bitter. To this end, this series of posts aims to aid new Nullsec pilots in their training, by specifying ships which are used in multiple doctrines; past, present and future, in Nullsec. Divided up into three posts (Quick Trains, Medium trains and the Long Term), pilots who follow this advice will find themselves quickly able to be useful within an Alliance. They will also be well poised to train more specialist ships to further flesh out their arsenal.

 

I think it’s worth prefacing this with some text about how Nullsec fleets work (at least in respect to ensuring you are always able to fly in them). This is where the concept of the Doctrine comes in. Doctrines are almost like recipes for fleets, supplied by the leadership of your group, which specify what ships are needed, in what quantities and how they should be fitted. Fleets generally consist of Ships of the Line (A main damage dealing ship like a battleship), Logistics, and a smattering of support ships (Electronic warfare, tackling and other utility ships). If you, as a new pilot, want to break into Nullsec, you won’t be able to simply rock up in your favourite PvE ship (with a point) and just get stuck in. You will need to fly ships which will be accepted into the doctrines of your group, and which will work within your fleets makeup.

This may sound simple. You look at the Ship of the line in your Alliances Doctrines, train for it, and get going. However, you need to understand that the metagame in Nullsec is constantly changing. Everything CCP does to balance, or modify the game, tends to have massive ripples in Nullsec. Some doctrines do hang around for long periods, but within most Alliances of note, they change on a monthly basis. As a new pilot, with lower skills you will find that constant rate of change hard to keep up with. In my early Nullsec days, I was constantly trying to catch up with the curve, training into a new ship just as it went out of fashion. But this guide is all about avoiding that race by training for ships which are accepted in multiple fleets; ships which are always useful for an FC to have no matter the fleet composition. The golden example of this of course is logistics, almost every fleet in the game, for a good few years now, have required a good backbone of Logistics ships. If you can fly a Guardian/Onieros and a Basilisk/Scimmitar you will be accepted into pretty much any fleet currently in the meta (The only exceptions to this I can think of are: Bombers, Black-ops hot drops, and Capital fleets). However to fly a Logistics properly takes a very long time (Logistics V and Remote Reps V are requirements, not niceties), so this set of guides will discuss other, similarly flexible ships which will help you become useful in Nullsec in a far shorted amount of time.

I’m not saying that you shouldn’t train for the Battleships, if you have them trained already, you might only need to mop-up some skills here and there (T2 guns etc), and you’ll be all set. However you should consider just how long it’s going to take before you rush towards the Rokh/Apoc etc. If you need to train Ship, Tank and support skills, it will likely take at least 4-5 months. On paper it looks like you can get into a battleship just a few weeks, but the reality is that flying one properly, will take a lot longer, and trying to shorten the training time is going to cripple your usefulness. This post looks at the true fastest ways into Nullsec combat, in 50 days you will be accepted into almost any Nullsec fleet, in 100 days you will be welcomed into fleets and in 6 months you will be begged to join fleets. While the foolhardy pilot spent a month training the basic requirements for a battleship, then another 5 months perfecting it, just in time for the next expansion to come out, and the composition to change completely. You will have 12 ships which you can pilot excellently, most likely unaffected by the changes in meta. These ships, have never gone out of fashion (and not because they were never in fashion).

You should also note that this guide assumes that you will be training all four races at once for the ships we discuss. This is advised because it maximises the likelihood of you having at least a ship which works with the fleet. It will also stand you in good stead for future training, bringing you closer to having all the ships. If you desperately need to trim the training times, you could consider only training two races, one shield and one Armor (I would advise minmattar and Gallentte). But it’s a big risk, so don’t blame me if your caught with the wrong ships!

Sales pitch over, let’s get on with the first group, Quick Trains; for the brave new pilots brought in by B-R this one is for you:

T1 frigates

I said it was quick didn’t I? If you have completed the tutorial you’ll already have one race’s T1 ships trained. Furthermore to train the other three races (to level IV) will take you around 6 days in total. There are of course plenty of support skills which are going to be important to you, but we will discuss them in a moment. First let’s look at specifically which ships you should be looking to use, and how you are going to be expected to use them.

 

The role you are aiming to fill here is that of poor man’s interceptor. Cheap T1 hulls designed for nothing more than getting into the enemy fleet, and tackling (preventing warp) enemy ships. As such it’s the faster, agile ships in each races selection which you’ll be flying. Specifically the Executioner, Condor, Atron and Slasher hulls. These ships are fasted in class, and receive a bonus to their Propulsion jamming systems. Perfect.

 

With that bonus, and your role in mind, your important modules are going to be as follows:

  • Nanofiber Internal Hull T2 -make you faster and more agile
  • Damage Control T2 – often your only tank
  • Medium Shield extenders T2 – your tank when it’s not just the Damage Control
  • Warp Scramblers T2 – stopping warp, Micro Jump and Micro Warp drives
  • Warp Disruptors T2 – Stopping warp at a longer distance
  • Stasis Webifier T2 – slows things down
  • Afterburners T2 – making you fast
  • Microwarp Drives T2 – making you really fast.
  • Micro Auxiliary power core T1 – Helps fit big things to little ships

If you can use all of the above modules to T2 you should also look into getting the following support skills to level IV (Ordered by importance):

  • Navigation
  • Acceleration Control
  • Evasive Maneuvering
  • Mechanics
  • Shield Management
  • Shield Operation
  • Fuel Conservation
  • Highspeed Maneuvering
  • Warpdrive operation
  • Astronautic Rigging
  • Signature Analysis
  • Long Range Targeting
  • Weapons Upgrades
  • Target Management
  • Drones (as needed)
  • Small Guns in all Races & Rockets and Light missiles (damage is not that important tbh)

 

Training all of these plus the frigates themselves will take around 55 days. Ask your fleet mates about exact fittings, to ensure you fly something which works with their fleets. Once completed most fleets will accept you in as light tackle (dependent on how strict they are). Once in combat, simply move into the enemy fleet (consider learning more about Traversal) and pick an enemy to tackle, then lock him down until your friends kill him. Depending on the size of the fleet, and how your FC likes to operate, you may be asked to call out who you have tackled, so that the FC can prioritise targets you have made vulnerable. This is the most basic (yet essential) of Nullsec roles, and it has an immediate next logical step, right into the:

 

Interceptors

These are the faster cousins of the tackling frigates you have been piloting so far. Harder, faster, more agile than the T1 versions and with a bonus to Microwarpdrives, Propulsion jamming and damage. Of course they also cost (a lot) more than the frigates, so make sure you can fly them well before graduating onto these wonderful little ships. Training these takes an additional 50 days (for all of them) on top of the T1 frigates, but as they share the same important modules and support skills, once you have trained frigates V and Interceptors to IV for each race, you’re ready to go.

 

If you have learned how to fly the T1 frigate well, you will know how to fly these. However you will find that they will survive where your T1 frigate would have evaporated. This is a clear and simple upgrade to what you were doing, and they are even more acceptable in a fleet because of their specialism.

 

As a supplemental bonus to their use as fleet ships Interceptors also have a role in making you money in Nullsec. Not only are they fast and agile, but then can also ignore Warp Bubbles, meaning that they can often (with a little skill and practice) effectively run gate camps. If your struggling to make money (or need a bigger buffer to fly interceptors in fleets), consider using the Interceptor as a miniature blockade runner, moving small items into Nullsec for sale. Skillbooks, drugs and small amounts of modules can be bought in Highsec and ferried out for sale in Null for a healthy profit. Doing this will soon fund any habit you get for loosing ships. Just don’t pack them full of your life savings and losses it all to an insta-lock gate camp (they are a thing). The next ship may just require you to have a little more cash.

 

Interdictors

These ships are the Area of effect tacklers of eve, where the interceptor runs in and stops a single ship, the interdictor runs in, drops an area of effect tackle zone, and races out of dodge. There not entirely different to the Interceptors and T1 frigates you have flown so far, but there is a significant difference in flying them that is going to take a little bit of getting used to. Interdictors will also be your first step up class wise, as they use Destroyer hulls, one above the frigates you have been flying so far. Sadly there is no T1 version of this ship (although Talwars are currently popular in null), so the training time reflects the need to train through all five levels of destroyers, and four levels of interdictors as well. Because of this longer training time, and the fact that the Destroyer, and Interdictor skills are required for nothing more than progressing to Cruisers, some people might be tempted to skip this 30 day train. However I would advise that the humble Interdictor is probably one of the most called for ships in eve, second only to the Logistics ship. If you can fly all of these you will be accepted into nearly any fleet of any size, and you will also be first port of call should a capital, or super capital be caught. Interdictors also have a healthy ability to do both solo and small gang combat, so the 80 days spent will truly give you a lot of versatility. Again they also share supporting skills with Interdictors and Interceptors, so once that 80 days is up, you’re ready to rock and roll.

 

That’s it, 6 months of training to ensure your future usefulness in Null sec, and you’ll be flying within the first month of training as well. Below you will find an eve mon skill plan, which will guide you thought what to train (note that it’s not prioritised, so use the post above to order the queue!). Happy hunting, and next time I will post a set of ships and training which will improve your acceptance even further, but at the cost of longer skill training, carrying on from these basic three ship classes.

EveMon

Fly fresh,

Hark

Edit: Missed some skills which were dramatically reducing the total training time (lvl V ships, derp). added them in an updated the training queue.